The Flag of the
Pawnee Nation
©Copyright Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, P.O. Box 438 Pawnee,Ok 74058
For problems or questions regarding this web contact
webmaster@pawneenationtaxcommission.com
last updated June 21, 2005
©Copyright Pawnee Nation of Oklahoma, P.O. Box 438 Pawnee,Ok 74058
For problems or questions regarding this web contact
webmaster@pawneenationtaxcommission.com
last updated September 25, 2007
                                 





















The miniature stars and stripes on the blue field symbolizes America.

The Plains Indian Tribes called the Pawnee ‘wolves’ because of their cunning
and courage.  Thus, the emblem of the wolf, which also meant to the Pawnees
“Men of Men”.

Crossed on the blue field is a peace pipe and tomahawk.  The peace pipe
standing for peace and the tomahawk for war.

Below are eight arrowheads emblematic of the wars in which the Pawnees
have fought in the service of their country; the Indian wars, the Spanish
American war, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Viet Nam, Desert Storm,
and Iraq.

The flag means Pawnee Indians, in peace and war, always courageous and
always loyal to America.

The flag staff is an old time Pawnee Lance with a genuine flint spearhead.

The staff has beadwork mounted on buckskin opposite the blue field.  The
many colors in the beadwork symbolize our various ceremonies and our old
people who have gone on before us.

The four prime eagle feathers attached to the top of the flag represent the four
Pawnee bands; Chaui, Pitahawirata, Skidi, and Kitkehahki.

A sprig of cedar should be attached to the staff during homecoming, Armistice
Day, Christmas and on occasions of state.  We use cedar in sacred
ceremonies, and use it also for prayer.  It is a token of prayer and a token of
peace.

Like the flag of the United States, the Pawnee Indian Flag should never be
desecrated and it should never touch the ground.